HPCG Committee member Frank Buddingh has organized a Blackberry Plant Sale

0 Share

HPCG Committee member Frank Buddingh has organized a Blackberry Plant Sale

Buddinghtree Consultancy LLC “Balancing the Needs of Trees and People” Tree Management and Diagnostics Larchmont, 15 March 2018 To All concerned, New Rochelle was some place o ...

Buddinghtree Consultancy LLC

“Balancing the Needs of Trees and People”

Tree Management and Diagnostics

Larchmont, 15 March 2018

To All concerned,

New Rochelle was some place of repute in terms of fruit tree and berry nurseries during the mid nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  Notably a few pear varieties and also the above Lawton Blackberry.

Thanks to my recent involvement with the Hudson Park Children’s Greenhouse [restoration] project the existence of ‘New Rochelle Heritage’ fruit varieties was brought to my attention.

This peaked my interest and I set out on a internet search tour to see if I could locate any of these plants. And I scored my first success with locating the Lawton Blackberry.

I would like to reintroduce this plant into New Rochelle and at the same time take the opportunity to be able to sell plants as a fundraiser for the above mentioned restoration project.

I am delighted to announce that I found up to 500 plants of the Lawton Blackberry.  The entire profit of the sales will be donated to the Hudson Park Children’s Greenhouse project.

Price:

  • 1-5 plants $16.50 each
  • 5 plants and over: $ 14.00 each

Payment accepted per check or PayPal.  The plant order will be place at the latest on 12 April.  That is the absolute deadline.  They will ship to New Rochelle and you will received details per email where to collect your order.

Email for : buddinghtree@buddinghtree.com

Kind regards,

Frank Buddingh’

THE LAWTON BLACKBERRY (from Wikipedia)

“The Lawton blackberry (often referred to as New Rochelle and Secor’s Mammoth ) originated in the village of New Rochelle in New York , and was the first widely cultivated variety of blackberry in the United States . It was either an accidental seedling from a wild variety of blackberry, or possibly a sort accidentally brought to this country by the French Huguenots who settled New Rochelle in 1688.

The fruit-bearing bush is from the genus Rubus, in the rose family, and bears large berries that grow to about an inch long. The first plant was discovered in 1834 by Lewis Seacor, who noticed the plant growing wild in a field owned by neighbor Frederick Prime. ( He is a 3d greategrandPa of Hare Delafield, his daughter Emily was married into Delafield Family, he was one of the richest bankers in NY)

Seacor was initially drawn to the fruit on account of its large size and rich flavor and, in 1838, he removed some of the plants to his garden and began their cultivation. Several years later he began distributing plants to neighbors and townspeople whose interest in the new fruit helped spread its notoriety. Throughout the region the blackberry became commonly known as”Seacor’s Mammoth”.

In 1848, George Seymour & Co., of Norwalk, Ct., nurserymen, obtained some plants and began working to increase their stock before advertising the new berry to the general public. At the same time, William Lawton, also of New Rochelle, obtained his first plants and spent the next several years working on their propagation. In 1853, Lawton showed the berries at a meeting of the “American Farmers’ Club”, stating that while he did not know who initially discovered the plant and brought it into garden culture, it was found on the roadside and thence introduced into neighboring gardens. The Farmers’ Club passed a vote of thanks to Mr. Lawton, and named the fruit the “Lawton Blackberry”.

Individuals in New Rochelle, acquainted with the blackberry, knew of its discovery by Seacor and referred to the plant as “Seacor’s” or “Seacor’s Mammoth”. It was also well known that Mr. Prince, owner of the farm where the fruit was found, actually destroyed many of the original bushes while making improvements to the property without knowing anything of their existence, and, was it not for Seacor’s efforts, the fruit would have become extinct. (Wikipedia)”.

Very sweet medium berries ripen in mid season.  It has very small thorns.

 

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>